Nationalism

Pakistani national lands in Delhi, says “I am an ISI agent”!

In a fascinating development, a Pakistani national landed at Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport and claimed to be an ISI agent. He even talked of defecting to India.

“Hello, I am an ISI agent. But I don’t wish to continue any further and want to remain in India,” is what a passenger said after he got off an Air India flight from Dubai at the IGI Airport on Friday.

Muhammad Ahmad Sheikh Muhammad Rafiq, a Pakistani passport holder, approached a help desk at the airport and conveyed to a lady at the counter that he wanted to share information about Pakistan’s snooping agency, ISI.

38-year-old Rafiq arrived by Air India’s flight from Dubai and was further booked for Kathmandu. However, he did not take the next flight and instead walked up to the help-desk counter at the airport t0 reveal his identity.

The lady who talked to Rafiq quickly informed security officials who detained him immediately and informed the central intelligence agencies.During questioning, Rafiq said he was connected with the ISI but had decided to call it a day and remain in India.He was taken to an undisclosed location where he was questioned by sleuths from various central intelligence agencies. His claims are being verified.

This episode seems to be taken right out of the Cold War Era where defection of spies was frequent and even proved on occasions to be game-changers as far as geopolitics is concerned. During those times, mostly Russian spies would defect to Western nations as they were enamoured by the democratic way of life of these nations.

What remains to be seen now is whether this ISI agent is a genuine spy or not. If he is, only time will tell if the information he provides will be of any major relevance or not. Also, what our intelligence agencies will be careful of is whether Rafiq is actually sent by the ISI to pretend defection and continue acting as a spy for the ISI while being a part of the Indian establishment.


Vinayak Jain

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